The Halfway House

TOURISM INFORMATION

 

 

We'll be building up a list of places of interest local to The Halfway House that registered users can rate. This will help visitors to the area find the best places to go and might even provide some inspiration for us locals too. If you want more information on any of these, why not pop in and see us - we might have some further literature, advice or even discount tickets for some of them.

Camping in the Cotswolds

Camping in the Cotswolds

 



Nestling amid the beautiful rolling countryside of the Cotswolds is a 40-pitch caravan site that's a family-fun paradise.





This was the review by Val Chapman, Associate Editor of  "WHICH CARAVAN" (April 2009 issue) following her stay with us last year.



 



Open from 21 March to 1 November 2009, this two-acre, level grassy site has 40 pitches (16 of which have electric hook-up), its own spring-water supply, toilets, showers, dishwashing facilities, chemical toilet disposal and waste water disposal.


Website

http://www.cotswoldfarmpark.co.uk

 

liked by 83 people 83 recommends

 

 

Cotswold Farm Park

Cotswold Farm Park

 



The halfway house is the closest pub to the cotswold farm park


 


The Cotswold Farm Park is the “Home of Rare Breed Conservation” set high up on the Cotswold Hills in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).




Our comprehensive collection of over 50 breeding flocks and herds of British rare breed farm animals was established by Joe Henson and his business partner John Neave, in the late 1960’s when many of our traditional breeds were faced with imminent extinction. Besides being a vital “shop window” for the work of rare breed conservation, it is an important breeding centre for many of the animals we keep.



The Cotswold Farm Park has welcomed over 2.5 million happy visitors in the 38 years since opening and has been described by the Good Britain Guide as “having memorable appeal and something special, which lifts it above the competition”. The success of the Farm Park continues due to the family run atmosphere, good value for money and underlying feeling for conservation. We are very proud of our excellent reputation and to be welcoming the third generation of visitors.


Website

http://www.cotswoldfarmpark.co.uk

 

liked by 72 people 72 recommends

 

 

Guiting Power

Guiting Power

 


           

The typical Cotswolds village of Guiting Power lies on a tributory of the river Windrush, its russet-coloured houses clustered round a sloping green. The buildings are restored by a self-help housing trust, initially set up for twelve cottages in 1934.


This delightful village is a fascinating example of the unconcious harmony created by Cotswold masons over the centuries. The cottages, shops and inns are all beautifully cared for. The Farmers Arms in the village and the Hollow Bottom Inn on the road leading to Winchcombe form welcome breaks on a number of glorious walks that can be taken in this area - north-westwards to Guiting Woods, south-eastwards down the Windrush Valley to Naunton, or south-westwards to Hawling.

 

liked by 13 people 13 recommends

 

 

Moreton in Marsh

Moreton in Marsh

 


           

Moreton-in-Marsh is one of the principal market towns in the northern Cotswolds situated on the Fosse Way and now served by the main line railway from London Paddington. It grew up in the thirteenth century as a market town with a wide main street, narrow burgage plots and back lanes. There still is a busy Tuesday market with about 200 stalls attracting many visitors. See image of Tolls charged in 1905.


Moreton has been a traveller's town for at least 1700 years and was used as a coaching station before the coming of the Oxford to Worcester railway in 1853. There are several pubs, inns, hotels, tea shops, restaurants and accommodation in the form of B&Bs and holiday cottages in the immediate vicinity. A popular caravan site exists just on the outskirts of the town.


The high street has many elegant eighteenth-century inns and houses including the Redesdale Market Hall (seen in the above picture). This hall is at the centre of the town, a plaque on the building reads -



"The Redesdale Hall was erected in 1887 by Sir Algernon Bertram Freeman Mitford, G.C.V.O., K.C.B., 1st Baron Redesdale, Lord-of-the-Manor of Moreton-in-Marsh in pious Memory of his kinsman, Earl of Redesdale, 1805-1886".



The Hall was subsequently purchased by Sir Gilbert Alan Hamilton Wills, BART, O.B.E, The First Baron Dulverton who presented it in the year 1951 to The North Cotswold Rural District Council.


Website

http://www.moreton-in-marsh.info

 

liked by 14 people 14 recommends

 

 

Stow on the Wold

Stow on the Wold

 

Stow-on-the-Wold is a delightful market town and along with Moreton in Marsh, perhaps the best known of the small Cotswolds towns.

Stow-on the-Wold stands exposed on a 700 feet high hill at a junction of seven major roads, including the Roman Fosse Way.


At the height of the Cotswold wool industry the town was famous for its huge annual fairs where as many as 20,000 sheep were sold at one time.


The vast Market Square testifies to the towns former importance. At one end stands the ancient cross, and at the other the town stocks, shaded between an old elm tree. Around the square the visitor is faced with an elegant array of Cotswold town houses.


Stow is an important shopping centre and has many fine Antique shops, Art galleries, Gifts and Crafts and is a centre for Walking the Cotswolds countryside.


Website

http://www.stowonthewold.info/

 

liked by 14 people 14 recommends